DRY EYES & DRY EYE SYNDROME

Dry eye occurs when the eye does not produce tears properly, or when the tears are not of the correct consistency and evaporate too quickly. Tears, made by the lacrimal gland, are necessary for overall eye health and clear vision. Tears bathe the surface of the eye,keeping it moist, and wash away dust and debris. They also help protect the eye from bacterial and other types of infections. Tears are composed of three major components: a) outer, oily, lipid layer produced by the meibomian glands; b) middle, watery, lacrimal layer produced by the lacrimal glands; and c) inner, mucous or mucin layer produced by goblet cells located within a thin transparent layer over the white part of the eye and covering the inner surface of the eyelids. Tears are made of proteins (including growth factors), electrolytes, and vitamins that are critical to maintain the health of the eye surface and to prevent infection.
Tears are constantly produced to bathe, nourish, and protect the eye surface. They are also produced in response to emergencies, such as a particle of dust in the eye, an infection or irritation of the eye, or an onset of strong emotions. When the lacrimal glands fail to produce sufficient tears, dry eye
can result.
Any disease process that alters the components of tears can make them unhealthy and result in dry eye.

What are the symptoms of dry eye?


  • Dry eye symptoms may include any of the following
  • Stinging or burning of the eye;
  • A sandy or gritty feeling as if something is in the eye;
  • Episodes of excess tears following very dry eye periods;
  • A stringy discharge from the eye;
  • Pain and redness of the eye;
  • Episodes of blurred vision;
  • Heavy eyelids;
  • Inability to cry when emotionally stressed;
  • Uncomfortable contact lenses;
  • Decreased tolerance of reading, working on the computer, or any activity that requires sustained visual attention; eye fatigue.